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The Best Foods to Eat on an Eco-Friendly Diet – Part 2

The Best Foods to Eat on an Eco-Friendly Diet
The Best Foods to Eat on an Eco-Friendly Diet

Garden peas

Peas fix nitrogen into soil naturally, which makes them a more eco-friendly option that soybean plants. The ability to fix nitrogen into soil means that synthetic fertiliser isn’t needed and that the soil will remain rich with nutrients post-harvest. Pea Plants perform well in cooler conditions, which reduces water waster related to hot temperatures.

Tomatoes

A summer ripe and local-grown tomato ranks low when it comes to your carbon footprint and also comes with a taste to make you want to steer clear of shipped and stingy supermarket tomatoes forever. As well as having a favourable carbon footprint, tomatoes grow deep root systems, absorbing moisture from deeper soil and reducing a need for water in warm summer months.

Broccoli

Production of broccoli releases less carbon than one mile of driving. Further, this vegetable, which is rich in nutrients, doesn’t require synthetic pesticides to grow. Broccoli, which belongs to the cabbage family, produces compounds that do the job of a natural pesticide.

Broccoli
Broccoli

Nuts

Another source of protein that is low in carbon, four ounces of nuts consumed is equal to the carbon emissions that are a result of more than half a mile driving. When you factor in that one ounce is equal to one serving size, on average, that’s one very efficient snack. That isn’t the case with peanut butter, however, so bear that in mind, as processing adds to nut butters’ carbon footprint.

Amaranth

A grain full of nutrients and proteins, this plant is extremely resilient, only needs a small amount of water, and is capable of growing in all soil conditions. Amaranth is regarded as an asset when it comes to addressing the scarcity of food. It also adds biodiversity to a U.S. grain crop that is otherwise monoculture.

Potatoes

Fungicides and natural pesticides are products of potato plants, which cuts down on the reliance for synthetic chemicals. These water-efficient crops consume just 50 gallons for every pound (for comparison, rice consumes a massive 402 gallons), and is capable of being stored for a long time before going bad.

Potatoes
Potatoes

Local, seasonal fish

The main issue concerning the planet’s fish supplies is overfishing, as opposed to climate change. While overfishing is a global issue, it’s at its worst close to countries with weak regulations. The pace of fishing doesn’t give them an opportunity to rebuild their populations, and each year, their numbers continue to fall.

Sustainable fishing is being done around the world, however. Buy fish that is in season, from sellers that describe the origins of the fish, and, if possible, from those who caught it, either at fish markets or farmer’s markets.

Tea is more widely consumed than any beverage besides water, and coffee ranks second in the world’s most traded commodities. Tea and coffee, however, are often grown in unethical and unsustainable ways. Deforestation and use of pesticides are too common, a great deal of oil is being burned by complex supply chains, and tea and coffee plantation workers are being exploited. Despite this, a large number of brands are working towards improving the conditions.

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